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dc.contributor.author Hayashi, Soichi
dc.contributor.author Gesing, Sandra
dc.contributor.author Quick, Rob
dc.contributor.author Teige, Scott
dc.contributor.author Ganote, Carrie
dc.contributor.author Wu, Le-shin
dc.contributor.author Prout, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-10T22:12:52Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-10T22:12:52Z
dc.date.issued 2013-03
dc.identifier.citation Hayashi, S., Gesing, S., Quick, R., Teige, S., Ganote, C., Wu, Le-S., Prout, E. 2013. Galaxy based BLAST submission to distributed national high throughput computing resources. Presentation. Presented at the International Symposium on Grids and Clouds (ISGC) 2013 March 23-28. 
Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2022/18609
dc.description.abstract To assist the bioinformatic community in leveraging the national cyberinfrastructure, the National Center for Genomic Analysis Support (NCGAS) along with Indiana University's High Throughput Computing (HTC) group have engineered a method to use the Galaxy to submit BLAST jobs to the Open Science Grid (OSG). OSG is a collaboration of resource providers that utilize opportunistic cycles at more than 100 universities and research centers in the US. BLAST jobs make a significant portion of the research conducted on NCGAS resources, moving jobs that are conducive to an HTC environment to the national cyberinfrastructure would alleviate load on resources at NCGAS and provide a cost effective solution for getting more cycles to reduce the unmet needs of bioinformatic researchers. To this point researchers have tackled this issue by purchasing additional resources or enlisting collaborators doing the same type of research, while HTC experts have focused on expanding the number of resources available to historically HTC friendly science workflows. In this paper, we bring together expertise from both areas to address how a bioinformatics researcher using their normal interface, Galaxy, can seamlessly access the OSG which routinely supplies researchers with millions of compute hours daily. Efficient use of these results will supply additional compute time to researcher and help provide a yet unmet need for BLAST computing cycles. en
dc.description.sponsorship This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. ABI-1062432, Craig Stewart, PI. William Barnett, Matthew Hahn, and Michael Lynch, co-PIs. This work was supported in part by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. and the Indiana University Pervasive Technology Institute. Any opinions presented here are those of the presenter(s) and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the National Science Foundation or any other funding agencies en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.rights Except where otherwise noted, contents of this presentation are copyright 2011 by the Trustees of Indiana University. This document is released under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). This license includes the following terms: You are free to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work and to remix – to adapt the work under the following conditions: attribution – you must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work). For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. en
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ en
dc.subject bioinformatics, NCGAS, OSG, open science grid, Galaxy, BLAST, science workflows en
dc.title Galaxy based BLAST submission to distributed national high throughput computing resources en
dc.type Presentation en
dc.altmetrics.display true en


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